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Liberty, conscience, and toleration : the political thought of William Penn
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Éditeur Oxford university press
Année copyright 2016
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Titre
Liberty, conscience, and toleration : the political thought of William Penn
Éditeur
Description
1 vol. (XIII-301 pages) ; 24 cm
Notes
Bibliogr. p. 259-289. Index
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Classification Dewey
974.802 092
Résumé
"In a seventeenth-century English landscape populated with towering political and philosophical figures like Hobbes, Harrington, Cromwell, Milton, and Locke, William Penn remains a man apart. In Liberty, Conscience, and Toleration, Andrew R. Murphy shows that, despite widespread scholarly neglected, William Penn was a sophisticated political thinker who contributed in decisive ways to the theory and practice of religious liberty in the early modern Atlantic world. The book elucidates the various political conflicts in which Penn participated, and the ways in which they facilitated the development of his political ideas over a forty-old-year political career. Murphy's picture of Penn's political thinking unfolds over the course of five engaging chapters, which focus on the main political episodes that occasioned his sustained attention as a political thinker and actor: the controversy over the Second Conventicle Act, the Popish Plot and Exclusion Crisis, the founding and settlement of Pennsylvania, and the contentious reign of James II. The book contextualizes the development of Penn's thought in England and America, illuminating the mutual interconnections between Penn's political thought and his colonizing venture in America. William Penn played a crucial role in the contentious emergence of religious liberty and remains a singular figure in the history of liberty of conscience. Penn's remarkable political theorizing provides a window into the increasingly vocal, organized, and philosophically sophisticated tolerationist movement that gained strength over the second half of the seventeenth century. Not only did Penn attempt to articulate principles of religious liberty as a Quaker in England, but he actually governed an American polity and experienced firsthand the complex relationship between political theory and political practice. Murphy's insightful analysis shows Penn's ongoing significance to the broader study of Anglo-American political theory and practice and the history of political thought. The examination of Penn's political thought ultimately points scholars toward a new way of understanding the history of political thought and the enterprise of political theory itself: what it is, where and how it is produced, and how it relates to political practice"--
"William Penn played a crucial role in the emergence of religious liberty and remains a singular, if often overlooked, figure in the history of liberty of conscience. Penn's political thought provides a window into the tolerationist movement that gained strength over the second half of the seventeenth century. In addition, Penn experienced firsthand the complex relationship between political theory and practice as proprietor of a major American colony. A careful examination of Penn's political thought points scholars toward a new way of understanding the enterprise of political theory itself"--
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